The Comm(you)te

(Everything about you and the carpool)

The Comm(you)te

(Everything about you and the carpool)

What's a Carpool Captain?

(Hint: Click & See)

LA vs. NYC : The one title the 2 cities won't fight over

 For the 6th consecutive year, the  city  of Los Angeles claimed the title  for  slowest city in peak commute  hours,  costing the average  commuter 102  hours and $1,445  dollars. The city of  New York  followed closely with the  average  commuter sitting 92 hours in  gridlock.

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What MIT says about Carpooling

The MIT researchers estimated that 2,000 four-person cars could cover nearly all (95%) of the demand for taxis in New York City, with an average wait time of less than three minutes.

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The Breakdown

Every week, those who drive alone lose money by doing that commute by themselves. With FareShare, drivers do their normal commute while trading in a few minutes for a more-than-few extra bucks. Drivers help out other their fellow carpoolers, and our planet as well.

(Variable costs include gas, tires and maintenance for the actual commute miles driven, but do not include ownership costs such as finance charges, insurance, license, registration, taxes or depreciation. Ownership costs would typically add about $450 per month to these costs.)

The Future of Commuting

Rick Warren once wrote that “we are products of our past, but we don’t have to be prisoners of it”. To understand the future of transportation and commuting, it is helpful to know the past, so we can do better in the future.

The canoe was one of the first methods of transportation and was invented in 8,000 BC. The carriage followed in 600 BC, the wheelbarrow in 230 AD, the car in late 19th century, the hot air balloon in 1783, and the steamboat in 1785.

Public transportation took a big leap in 1825 when the first passenger railway opened and in 1952 when the first jetliner took off. As a fun addition, the monster truck came to life in the 1950s and the segway in 2001.

 So, where are we heading?