Select Page

The Future of Commuting

Prototypes of the self-driving car are here. Even Uber’s ambitious team announced to have flyer cars in 2020 (Really! Check out an article about it here!). Other than these seemingly advanced examples, there are a few new transportation methods right on the horizon that would increase efficiency, lessen traffic, and reduce travel time.

 

Walking around popular cities, you may notice dockless bikes and electric scooters. The bigger scooter companies, like Bird and Line, are taking over big cities like Santa Monica and Nashville with their product on every corner. These scooters work by downloading an app on your phone, scanning a code on the scooter itself, and paying per minute as you ride. Growing rapidly as a new industry, dockless scooters and bikes are gaining a lot of traction and revenue (Line is valued at a $1 billion and Bird reports to be double that). With their success comes the downside. The scooters have been reported to cause multiple accidents and injuries; so much so that the city of Santa Monica has proposed a new bill that will reduce the number of scooters available by ⅔.

 

You might have heard of the new super-speedy-crazy-fast-train called the Hyperloop. This proposed mode of transportation uses a air-tight tube and magnetic technology to reduce air friction and travel at extremely high speeds. This passenger train would be able to travel to New York from Los Angeles in under 5 hours; that’s faster than a plane. The concept was first published in 2013 with the idea to travel from LA to San Francisco in 35 minutes. The construction for this system would cost $6 billion. SpaceX, another branch of the Elon Musk business ventures, even created a mile-long test track in Hawthorne, CA. In 2017, they had student teams create test pods in their Hyperloop Pod Competition. In 2017, the Technical University of Munich won when their pod broke 200 mph on the prototype track.

 

 

 

For commuters, a Hyperloop and Bird clearly can’t be used, meanwhile popular ride-hailing platforms like Uber and Lyft continue to increase in price. FareShare is getting rid of the binary divide between Driver and Rider, and creating commutes that are simply run by commuters all going the same way. As a result, prices go down for riders, drivers make the cost back for the commute they would’ve already done for free, and both save time using the carpool lane. Commuters are matched through preferences like music, sports, and more to create a seamless commuting experience.

 

 

As FareShare continues to make strides in the commuting field, future partnerships with autonomous companies will begin to form, allowing FareShare to give it’s riders access to autonomous cars.

 

 

Keep an eye out for the new methods of transportation coming to the forefront of the industry. Most of these products will be able to reduce the amount of traffic and congestion on our roads, and elevate transportation for all of the US and world.

The Future of Commuting

(7 min read)

Prototypes of the self-driving car are here. Even Uber’s ambitious team announced to have flyer cars in 2020 (Really! Check out an article about it here!). Other than these seemingly advanced examples, there are a few new transportation methods right on the horizon that would increase efficiency, lessen traffic, and reduce travel time.

Walking around popular cities, you may notice dockless bikes and electric scooters. The bigger scooter companies, like Bird and Line, are taking over big cities like Santa Monica and Nashville with their product on every corner. These scooters work by downloading an app on your phone, scanning a code on the scooter itself, and paying per minute as you ride. Growing rapidly as a new industry, dockless scooters and bikes are gaining a lot of traction and revenue (Line is valued at a $1 billion and Bird reports to be double that). With their success comes the downside. The scooters have been reported to cause multiple accidents and injuries; so much so that the city of Santa Monica has proposed a new bill that will reduce the number of scooters available by ⅔.

You might have heard of the new super-speedy-crazy-fast-train called the Hyperloop. This proposed mode of transportation uses a air-tight tube and magnetic technology to reduce air friction and travel at extremely high speeds. This passenger train would be able to travel to New York from Los Angeles in under 5 hours; that’s faster than a plane. The concept was first published in 2013 with the idea to travel from LA to San Francisco in 35 minutes. The construction for this system would cost $6 billion. SpaceX, another branch of the Elon Musk business ventures, even created a mile-long test track in Hawthorne, CA. In 2017, they had student teams create test pods in their Hyperloop Pod Competition. In 2017, the Technical University of Munich won when their pod broke 200 mph on the prototype track.

For commuters, a Hyperloop and Bird clearly can’t be used, meanwhile popular ride-hailing platforms like Uber and Lyft continue to increase in price. FareShare is getting rid of the binary divide between Driver and Rider, and creating commutes that are simply run by commuters all going the same way. As a result, prices go down for riders, drivers make the cost back for the commute they would’ve already done for free, and both save time using the carpool lane. Commuters are matched through preferences like music, sports, and more to create a seamless commuting experience.

As FareShare continues to make strides in the commuting field, future partnerships with autonomous companies will begin to form, allowing FareShare to give it’s riders access to autonomous cars.

Keep an eye out for the new methods of transportation coming to the forefront of the industry. Most of these products will be able to reduce the amount of traffic and congestion on our roads, and elevate transportation for all of the US and world.